Recipe: Ginger Beef

Happy Saturday everyone! How’s your weekend going so far?

I don’t know about you, but I don’t eat enough red meat. Why? Well, mostly because I get bored with how to prepare it.  I usually eat more of it when the weather is cooler by throwing it in to tomato sauces or making meat balls out of it. If I had a bbq, I’d totally be making hamburgers  but I don’t. So I’m not. But, this next recipe has made me forget all about juicy hamburgers. Trust me.

It’s another saucy one but just as easy (or easier) than the teriyaki recipe from Thursday. This was even amazing the next day. The combination of the ginger and the honey with the spices gave it so many levels of flavour. I happened to have made this on a cold, rainy day so this was the perfect remedy for feeling blah.

Ginger Sauce Ingredients:

  • 1/4″ piece of fresh ginger
  • 1 tbsp agave or honey
  • 3 tbsps of Bragg’s Liquid Aminos
  • 1 tbsp of apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 tsp of chili powder
  • 1/4 tsp of black pepper
  • 1/4 tsp of cumin
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 tbsp water
  • t tsp cornstarch, optional

Method:

Combine all ingredients (save for the cornstarch, that would be bad for business if yo mixed that in) in a blender or food processor until liquefied.

Done.

 Not to brag, but I saved myself about half a minute and bought my beef pre-cut. But, if you buy steaks, cube them so they are bite sized and easy to eat. Did you know that grocery stores are now selling anti-biotic and hormone free meat at about the same price as the other meat? If you had the choice, why wouldn’t you opt to buy that instead?

 To get started, add a bit of olive oil to your heated frying pan then throw in the beef. Let the beef simmer on one side for a few minutes or until it has browned.

Turn the meat pieces over and add your veggies.

For my veggies, I used a yellow bell pepper (chopped), spinach, carrots (chopped) and green onion (chopped), but be as creative as you like with your veggies. These were what I had on hand.

Pour your ginger sauce over the beef and veggies frying in your wok and let everything simmer for about 10 to 15 minutes (or until the meat and veggies have cooked). You’ll want to stir everything around about half-way through.

Before everything has cooked...
Before… 
After!

I served mine with brown rice pasta but this would be good on its own or with brown rice or quinoa.  I still had left over quinoa, so I was bad ass and mixed a bit of quinoa in with the beef plus the brown rice pasta. It was delicious!

TIP! If you want to thicken your sauce, like I did, remove the hot liquid from your wok after everything has cooked and in a separate bowl, stir in the corn starch with a fork (make sure you smush all the clumps, too). Once it has reached the desired thickness, add it back in to the stir fry.

Side Note: If you don’t feel like adding the veggies, no problem. Just cook the beef with the ginger sauce. You could always serve this with a side salad or whip up that asparagus dish from last week.

Enjoy!

Stay tuned for next weeks post  – all about turmeric!

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Benefits of Ginger

The second spice that I’d like to talk to you about in my spice series is ginger. And, no, I don’t mean this Ginger Spice. I’m referring to the super spice that adds a bit of zing to sauces and teas and is infamous in Asian cooking.

(Side note: Now I have that song, “Spice Up Your Life” stuck in my head. God, I miss the ’90s!).

Let’s jump in, shall we?

Ginger is a root that was originally cultivated in South Asia and has spread to East Africa and the Carribean. It’s available year round at your local market or grocery store.

Benefits:

  • Gastrointestinal relief. Prevents symptoms of motion sickness and seasickness. It also reduces other symptoms including nausea, dizziness, vomiting and cold sweats. It’s even safe to consume while you’re pregnant to aid with morning sickness.
  • Anti-inflammatory. It contains very potent anit-inflammatory compounds called gingerols. Studies have shown that it reduces pain for those suffering from osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. If you are suffering from Candida, like I was, ginger has a soothing effect on any inflammation that the candida growth may have on your intestinal tract.
  • Protection against colorectal cancer.
  • Induces cell death in ovarian cancer cells. The extracts in the ginger have been shown to have anti-tumour effects on cancer cells
  • Immune booster. This spice promotes healthy sweating which is very useful when you’re trying to fight off a nasty cold or flu. Usually, it’s used in ginger teas or hot drinks.

Fresh or dried?

Personally, I choose fresh whenever possible. Not only does it pack in more flavour but it contains higher levels of gingerol (that amazing element of ginger that gives us so many of those great benefits that I was telling you about). With that said, dried is useful if you’re making sauces or baking as it easily dissolves in the liquid.

I’ll admit it, ginger isn’t the most attractive thing you’ll see in the grocery store, but don’t  be put off by its nubbiness (if that’s even a word). Before you throw
one in your basket, make sure that it’s firm, smooth and free of mold.

Uses:

Ginger is often used in teas or hot drinks, especially if you aren’t feeling well. If I’m suffering from the flu or I’ve eaten something that isn’t quite agreeing with me, I’ll cut off a quarter inch of ginger, peel it, chop it into smaller pieces and either throw it my green tea or make a hot honey, lemon and ginger drink. It usually does the trick!

Tell us, what’s your favourite way to cook with ginger?

*** Stay tuned for my Asian inspired recipe using this zesty spice!

Enjoy!

Variety is the Spice of Life!

How many times have you read a recipe and thought, “I have NO IDEA what that spice is (or how to pronounce it) let alone how it will taste?” or “When will I ever use this spice again?” I have.

Before last year when I started my health make-over, I didn’t even own a spice rack! I was so intimidated by spices that if I didn’t recognize one or already have it I would deliberately omit it from the recipe. It’s like saying, “I don’t know what interest vs principle means, so I won’t bother trying to figure that out and I’ll just keep paying the minimum payment.” Imagine? Wait, don’t.

This month, I’m going to try to help take the mystery out of some spices that are not only common but should be added to your dishes frequently. Why? Mainly because not only do they add a punch of flavour but they happen to be very good for you!

Spices are great (and important) because they can turn any basic meal from ordinary to extraordinary!

The spices discussed will be: garlic, ginger, coriander, and turmeric. I consider these to be some of the essential spices.

My plan for the month of May is to demystify them by sharing with you some of their benefits and giving you some recipes to incorporate them in.

There are many others that I wanted to discuss but I wanted to start with these since they are on my top 10 list (yes, I actually have a top 10 list and anyone who knew me in my 20s would be shocked that am this in love with cooking and no longer in a passive-agressive realationship with Dominoes pizza!).

Don’t worry, I promise to do another Spice Month soon to discuss the other six spices that I deem essential and/or amazing.

Stay tuned!

First up: Garlic.

PS: Tell us, what is your  favourite spice?

PPS: What spice would you bring with you on a desert island?